Russia-Ukraine war live news: Moscow moving troops towards Kherson, Zelenskiy says; first grain shipment to leave Ukraine today, Turkey says

The first ship to export Ukrainian grain will depart from Ukrainian ports at 8.30am today, according to the Turkey’s Ministry of Defence.

The ministry issued an announcement at 7.30am local time, saying: “The first ship from Ukrainian ports will depart today at 8:30.”

Ukrayna limanlarından ilk gemi bugün saat 08.30’da hareket edecektir.#MSB pic.twitter.com/vi18ggoyAg

— T.C. Millî Savunma Bakanlığı (@tcsavunma) August 1, 2022

The first ships will arrive in Istanbul port on Wednesday 3 August en route to Africa, according to CNN.

Russia is likely re-allocating a significant number of its forces from the northern Donbas sector to southern Ukraine, the UK Ministry of Defence has said.

The latest intelligence report reads:

Over the last four days, Russia has continued to attempt tactical assaults on the Bakhmut axis, northeast of Donetsk, only managing to make slow progress.

Russia is probably adjusting the operational design of its Donbas offensive after failing to make a decisive operational breakthrough under the plan it had been following since April.

It has likely identified its Zaporizhzhia front as a vulnerable area in need of reinforcement.”

Latest Defence Intelligence update on the situation in Ukraine – 1 August 2022

Find out more about the UK government’s response: https://t.co/WFgCHPs7yY

🇺🇦 #StandWithUkraine 🇺🇦 pic.twitter.com/sU8IJmgiyF

— Ministry of Defence 🇬🇧 (@DefenceHQ) August 1, 2022

Russia appears to be stepping up its offensive on regions in Ukraine’s south.

The mayor of the southern city of Mykolaiv said two people were killed and three wounded after rockets pounded two residential districts on Sunday night.

Oleksandr Senkevych said the strikes were “probably the most powerful of the entire time [of the war]”.

Ukraine’s president, Volodymyr Zelenskiy, also addressed the attack in his latest national address:

Today, one of the most brutal shellings of Mykolaiv and the region over the entire period of the full-scale war took place. Dozens of missiles and rockets… The occupiers hit residential buildings, schools, other social infrastructure, and industrial facilities.”

A war crimes prosecutor examines the damage in a destroyed building, as Russia’s attack on Ukraine continues, following shelling in Mykolaiv, Ukraine, on 31 July.

The Russian attack also reportedly took the lives of Oleksiy Vadaturskyi, 74, and his wife Raisa, the founder of one of the largest Ukrainian agricultural companies ‘Nibulon’.

An adviser to the Ukrainian president has said he believes the leading Ukrainian agricultural magnate Oleksiy Vadatursky was deliberately killed when a missile struck their home in the southern city.

Mykhailo Podolyak said a missile hit the businessman’s bedroom, which he said “leaves no doubt” it was a targeted attack.

The first ship to export Ukrainian grain will depart from Ukrainian ports at 8.30am today, according to the Turkey’s Ministry of Defence.

The ministry issued an announcement at 7.30am local time, saying: “The first ship from Ukrainian ports will depart today at 8:30.”

Ukrayna limanlarından ilk gemi bugün saat 08.30’da hareket edecektir.#MSB pic.twitter.com/vi18ggoyAg

— T.C. Millî Savunma Bakanlığı (@tcsavunma) August 1, 2022

The first ships will arrive in Istanbul port on Wednesday 3 August en route to Africa, according to CNN.

Two people have reportedly been injured as a result of shelling this morning in Ukraine’s second-largest city of Kharkiv.

The head of the regional state administration, Oleg Synegubov, said Russia attacked the Saltiv district of the northeastern city and urged residents to stay in shelters in a Telegram post just before 8.30am on Monday.

Citing information from the regional centre for emergency medical assistance, he said two people were injured as a result of the shelling.

Britain will now require foreign companies holding UK property to identify their true owners in an official register as part of a crackdown on Russian oligarchs and corrupt elites laundering illicit wealth.

The register of overseas entities, which becomes active from today, is part of a wider economic crime law enacted this year in an effort to stop the flow of illicit Russian cash into London following Moscow’s invasion of Ukraine.

It will seek to ensure criminals cannot hide behind secretive chains of shell companies, and support government efforts to root out Russian oligarchs using property in Britain to hide dirty money, the business ministry said in a statement. Junior business minister Martin Callanan said:

To ensure we are free of corrupt elites with suspicious wealth, we need to know who owns what.

We are lifting the curtain and cracking down on those criminals attempting to hide their illicitly obtained wealth.”

Belgravia mansions at Eaton Square, also known as ‘Londongrad’, in London.

Foreign entities that already own land in the UK that is within the scope of the register will have six months to comply by identifying their beneficial owner to Companies House.

The register will apply to property bought since January 1999 in England and Wales, and since December 2014 in Scotland.

Those not complying with the new rules could face sanctions including fines of up to £2,500 ($3,043) per day or five years in prison.

The register has been described as a significant provision of the economic crime law, with a Transparency International official in March calling the step a “seismic change” that will force foreign property ownership into the open.

The law was brought in in March as the government faced calls to do more to make it harder for those close to Russian President Vladimir Putin to launder dirty money through property in London, long dubbed by some as “Londongrad”.

Russia is moving large numbers of troops to Ukraine’s south for battles against the country’s forces through the newly occupied territories and Crimea, according to Ukraine’s deputy head of military intelligence.

If Russia won, it would try to capture more territory, said Vadym Skibitsky. “They are increasing their troop numbers, preparing for our counteroffensive [in Ukraine’s south] and perhaps preparing to launch an offensive of their own. The south is key for them, above all because of Crimea,” he said.

A Russian military truck drives past an unexploded munition in the village of Chornobaivka, Kherson region, Ukraine.

Ukraine’s president Volodymyr Zelenskiy corroborated these reports in his latest national address, saying Russia was relocating troops from the east to the south of Ukraine in order to push towards Kherson’s regional capital as well as the Zaporizhzhia region.

“Now the Russian army is trying to strengthen its positions in the occupied areas of the south of our country, increasing activity in the relevant areas,” he said, adding that “strategically, Russia has no chance of winning this war”.

The fight for forest lines along the fields – this is what position war in the South of Ukraine is like now.

There forests are almost thick as Vietnam jungle. This is where the most violent battles take place face to face between our Heroes and Russians.#UkraineRussianWar pic.twitter.com/txRm4QCIas

— Anton Gerashchenko (@Gerashchenko_en) July 31, 2022

Russian troop movements come in response to Ukraine’s declared counteroffensive to liberate the southern occupied regions of Kherson and Zaporizhzhia.

Ukrainian forces have retaken dozens of villages and towns along the border, according to the region’s military governor, Dmytro Butrii, and are pushing towards Kherson’s regional capital.

Hello and welcome back to the Guardian’s live coverage of the war in Ukraine.

I’m Samantha Lock and I will be bringing you all the latest developments for the next short while.

According to multiple Ukrainian officials, Russia is moving large numbers of troops to Ukraine’s south where battles are expected to intensify.

From today, Britain will now require foreign companies holding UK property to identify their true owners as part of a crackdown on Russian oligarchs and corrupt elites laundering illicit wealth.

It is 8am in Ukraine. Here is everything you might have missed:

A woman gathers her belongings from a heavily damaged residential building in Saltivka, a northern district of the second largest Ukrainian city of Kharkiv on 31 July.

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